Speakers: SEJ Eleventh Annual Conference
Hosted by Portland State University, October 17-21, 2001
DRAFT: All Information Subject to Change

Alphabetical Speaker List
A-C
D-F
G-J
K-M
N-Q
R-S
T-Z

A-C
Acker, Gary
Alexander, Charles
Allen, Frank
Allen, Jennifer H.
Allen, William
Alvarez, Robert
Amador, Don
Amen, Steve
Anderson, Terry
Anderson, Witt
Apalategui, Eric
Aplet, Greg
Arnold, Elizabeth
Back, Brian
Baker, Bob
Balzar, John
Banse, Tom
Barker, Rocky
Barrie, Leonard
Benner, Richard
Bennett, Martha
Bennett, Rob
Bernton, Hal
Boa, Susan
Boden, Jeff
Bosch, Bill
Bowman, Heather
Boyd, Ken
Braasch, Gary
Bradbury, Mark
Bragdon, David
Brettmann, Allan
Briggs, Kara
Brinckman, Jonathan
Brod, Daniela
Brostoff, Jacob
Brown, George
Brown, Susan Jane
Bruggers, James
Bryant, Dirk
Bschor, Denny
Budnick, Nick
Burnside, Jeff
Burton, Mike
Caldwell, Dick
Cantwell, Maria
Carson, Richard
Castle, Duke
Cauley, Hank
Chandler, Pat
Charles, John
Clark, Lou
Clifford, Frank
Cohen, Jack
Colasurdo, Christine
Cole, Michelle
Cone, Marla
Craig, Carol
Cuff, Courtney
Curtis, Clifton
Curtis, Jeff
Cushman, Charles

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D-F
Dailey, Michelle
Deneen, Sally
Dewey, Dick
Doulos, Speros
Dunne, Mike
Durbin, Kathie
Dwyer, Tom
Edwards, Randall
Egan, Tim
Ellis, Richard
Eure, Rob
Fagin, Dan
Farquhar, Brodie
Felsot, Alan
Fernay, Erica
Foden-Vencil, Kristian
Fontenot, Donald
Foreman, Jane
Forgey, Pat
Franklin, Jerry
Frenzen, Peter
Fromherz, Frank

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G-J
Gahimer, Anita
Gahran, Amy
Gelobter, Michel
George, Christy
Gilbert, Glen
Goldman, Lynn
Good, Nathan
Gorman, Kevin
Grader, Zeke
Grossman, Elizabeth
Guerrant, Ed
Haddock, David
Haley, Chris
Hamann, Jack
Hammarlund, Jeff
Hammond, Allen
Happynook, Tom
Harden, Blaine
Harjo, Suzan Shown
Hartman, Mitchell
Harvey, Hal
Hatfield, Kim
Hauser, Jan
Heilprin, John
Helvarg, David
Henrikson, John
Henson, Paul
Hill, Richard
Houck, Mike
Howard, Kerry
Huhtala, Peter
Hulbe, Christina
Humphrey, Chip
Hunnicutt, Dave
Hunsberger, Brent
Hunt, Ed
Illyn, Peter
Izakson, Orna
Jacklet, Ben
James, Chris
Janetos, Anthony
Jianqiang, Liu
Johnston, Craig
Jortner, Roberta
Jun, Ma

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K-M
Karpinski, John
Kaufman, Paul
Kennard, Byron
Kirsch, Steve
Klein, Keith
Koch, Roy
Kriz, Margaret
Landry, Clay
Lesley, Craig
Little, Jane Braxton
Livingstone, Gary
Llanos, Miguel
Lovelin, Bruce
Lowe, Roy
Lunch, Bill
Lundy, Charles
Mackenzie, Bill
Mapes, Jeff
Marbet, Lloyd
Mauer, Richard
Mazurek, Robert
McClure, Robert
McCurdy, Mary Kyle
Means, Shelley
Mears, David
Melanson, Tom
Meninick, Jerry
Midaugh, Jim
Mielke, Alison
Milarch, David
Miller, Robert
Miller, Pam
Miller, Scott
Milstein, Michael
Mittermeier, Russell
Mock, Terry

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N-Q
Neutra, Raymond
Nilsen, Fred
Norse, Elliott
Norton, Gale
O'Hara, Jim
Osborn, Rachael Paschal
Otanez, Andrea
Overpeck, Jonathan
Park, Rod
Patton, Vince
Pawelski, Natalie
Pernick, Ron
Perry, Steve
Pickell, Bill
Pinkham, Sr., Allen
Pitney, John
Platt, Ernie
Poracsky, Joe
Powell, Jerry
Pray, David
Pynn, Larry

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R-S
Radford, Irene
Raeburn, Paul
Raloff, Janet
Rebstock, Jeanne
Reed, Len
Reiber, Derek
Reinig, Joyce
Reynolds, John
Rivard, Jacques
Roach, Linda
Roberts, Roby
Robertson, Lance
Robinson, Erik
Rodekohr, Mark
Rogers, Paul
Rosebraugh, Craig
Ross, Kelly
Ross, Steven Sander
Rowe, Sandra Mims
Roy, Jeanne
Russell, Dick
Sampson, Don
Santucci, Peter
Saul, Susan
Schoch, Deborah
Schulberg, Rick
Shaffer, Jeff
Shaw, David
Sheckley, Robert
Shimshak, Rachel
Silver, Scott
Sirkin, Sam
Skeels, Michael
Slivka, Judd
Smith, Ted
Steele, Karen Dorn
Steen, Trygve
Steiner, Bill
Strassman, Neil Owen
Sutherland, Bruce

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T-Z
Thomson, Peter
Turner, Jennifer
Ulrich, Roberta
Ustin, Susan
Vanderkamp, Lynn
von Hagen, Bettina
Wallace, John Michael
Watson, Paul
Weinhold, Robert
Wells, Luci
Wentz, Patty
Werntz, Dave
West, Chris
Wexler, Phil
Wheeler, Tim
Whitelaw, Ed
Whitman, Christine Todd
Williams, David
Williams, Travis
Withers, Gary
Wiwchar, David
Woodward, Lindsey
Worme, Rene
Wright, Steven
Xiguang, Li
Yoon, Carol Kaesuk
Zimmer, Chris

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Gary Acker
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Green Buildings

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Charles Alexander
Event: Friday, Lunch and Plenary Session, 12:00 p.m. -
The Bush Agenda

Charles Alexander spent 23 years as a reporter, writer and editor at TIME Magazine, and retired this year. He has been an international editor since 1995, working on the magazine's 10 foreign editions. Charles also edited TIME's planet of the year story in 1989, the "Our Precious Planet" issue in 1997, the heroes for the planet series from 1998 to 2000 and the global warming story in 2001.

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Frank Allen
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE CRAFT: Getting the Right Play for Your Story

Frank Edward Allen, former environment editor for The Wall Street Journal, has covered environmental and economic news for nearly 30 years. Before spending 14 years at the WSJ, he was a reporter and editor for the Eugene Register-Guard, The Associated Press, Reuters, the Tucson Daily Citizen and the Minneapolis Star. Now he is president of the Institutes for Journalism & Natural Resources.

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Jennifer H. Allen
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

Jennifer H. Allen is the sustainable business liaison with the Oregon Economic and Community Development Department. She worked at the World Bank between 1987 and 1997 on a range of projects related to sustainable development in Africa, Eastern Europe and Latin America. Jennifer came to Oregon in 1997 to serve as executive vice president of Ecotrust, a non-profit organization working to develop the "conservation economy" in the coastal temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest.

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William Allen
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE GLOBE: Peril in Paradise: The Ecological Crisis on Pacific Islands

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Robert Alvarez
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Our Nuclear Legacy: Cleaning Up After the Arms Race

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Don Amador
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE LAND: Fighting Back: The Western Wise Use Movement

Don Amador works as the western representative for the BlueRibbon Coalition and has spent the last 11 years successfully advocating environmentally sound multiple-use recreation of public lands. He represented multiple-use recreation as a delegate to the 7th American Forest Congress in Washington D.C. He was a speaker at the 1999 Recreation Carrying Capacity Conference at Colorado State University in 1999 and also spoke on the roadless issue at the 2000 Annual Outdoor Writers Association of America Conference held in North Carolina.

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Steve Amen
Event: Thursday, 9:00 p.m. - Welcome to the Wild Northwest

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Terry Anderson
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE LAND: Fighting Back: The Western Wise Use Movement

Terry Anderson is the executive director of PERC, a think-tank focusing on market solutions to environmental problems located in Bozeman, Montana. Anderson is the author or editor of 24 books, including "Free Market Environmentalism" (Pacific Research Institute 1991), co-authored with Donald Leal, and "Enviro-Capitalists: Doing Good While Doing Well" (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1997), also co-authored with Donald Leal. His current projects include a forthcoming book with P. J. Hill on "The Not So Wild, Wild West" and "The Law and Economics of Property Rights" which he is co-editing with Fred McChesney.

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Witt Anderson
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Salmon 1: Dams, Hatcheries and Treaty Rights

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Eric Apalategui
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge

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Greg Aplet
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE LAND: Wildfires: Man, Nature and Journalists - Better Coverage of the Burning Issues

Greg Aplet is director of the Center for Landscape Analysis, The Wildlife Society's GIS and remote sensing laboratory. Greg is part of the core group that crafted the national 10-year comprehensive fire strategy, scheduled for release by the Western Governors' Association in mid-June 2002. Greg co-authored "Sustaining Biodiversity in the Southern Appalachians" (The Wilderness Society, 1994) and "Salvage Logging in the National Forests: An Ecological, Economic, and Legal Assessment" (TheWilderness Society, 1996).

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Elizabeth Arnold
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE CRAFT: How to Make Environmental Stories Resonate

Elizabeth Arnold covers many environmental stories for National Public Radio. She has served as national political correspondent and covered the 1992 and 1996 political campaigns. She began her broadcast career in 1985 in Juneau, Alaska, where she reported on the Exxon Valdez oil spill. She has won numerous awards, including the 1994-95 duPont-Columbia Silver Baton Award for coverage of Capitol Hill after the 1994 elections.

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Brian Back
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

Brian Back is a former reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where he covered growth and real estate in one of the nation's fastest-growing suburban counties. In recent years, he earned a master's degree in mass communication from Georgia State University. Brian has covered sprawl issues and developed an augmented environment beat for The Business Journal in Portland.

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Bob Baker
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE CRAFT: How to Make Environmental Stories Resonate

Bob Baker is a deputy metropolitan editor of the Los Angeles Times, supervising reporters who cover race, ethnicity, demographics and religion. He is the author of "Newsthinking: The Secret of Making Your Facts Fall into Place" (Allyn & Bacon, 2001), a book on mental organization for journalists. He runs a web site, www.newsthinking.com, which offers weekly tips on writing. In 2000, he served as the L.A. Times' first full-time writing coach.

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John Balzar
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE CRAFT: How to Make Environmental Stories Resonate

John Balzar is a Los Angeles Times editorial columnist who frequently writes about environmental issues. During his 21 years at the Times, he has been a political writer, Northwest bureau chief, a foreign correspondent based in Nairobi, and, most recently, a roving correspondent. He won the Ernie Pyle Award from the Scripps Howard Foundation in 1998. Balzar is the author of "Yukon Alone," an account of the Yukon Quest International Dog Sled Race, published this year by Owl Books.

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Tom Banse
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE GLOBE: Sitting In: Rising Civil Disobedience in the Environmental Movement

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Rocky Barker
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Salmon 1: Dams, Hatcheries and Treaty Rights

Rocky Barker is the author of "Saving All the Parts, Reconciling Economics and the Endangered Species Act," which was published in 1993 by Island Press. He also co-authored the "Flyfisher's Guide to Idaho" and the "Wingshooters Guide to Idaho." As well, Rocky is environmental reporter for the Idaho Statesman, where he was the primary researcher for an award-winning series of editorials calling for the breaching of four Snake River dams to save salmon.

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Leonard Barrie
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE GLOBE: Around the World in Ten Days

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Richard Benner
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

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Martha Bennett
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

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Rob Bennett
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Green Buildings

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Hal Bernton
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
The Changing Face of Farms

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Susan Boa
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Consumer Clout: How Purchasing Power Can Influence the Environment

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Jeff Boden
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
The Changing Face of Farms

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Bill Bosch
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Spirit of the Salmon

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Heather Bowman
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE FUTURE: High Tech Trash: How to Cover America's Newest Toxic Waste Crisis

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Ken Boyd
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE LAND: Drilling the Midnight Wilderness: Oil and Gas Exploration in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

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Gary Braasch
Event: Thursday, 9:00 p.m. - Welcome to the Wild Northwest

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Mark Bradbury
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
The Changing Face of Farms

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David Bragdon
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

David Bragdon is presiding officer of the Metro Council. He sets the agenda, manages the staff and is generally responsible for the operations of the Council office. Before his current position, David was assistant international transportation manager for Nike; he helped develop the company's global shipping strategy. He also spent five years as marketing manager for the Port of Portland.

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Allan Brettmann
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge

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Kara Briggs
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Native American Sovereignty and the Environment: What They Wouldn't Teach You in School

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Jonathan Brinckman
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Salmon 1: Dams, Hatcheries and Treaty Rights

Jonathan Brinckman covers rivers and oceans for The Oregonian and has written many stories on Columbia River salmon, federal dams and hatcheries. He has held environment reporting beats at The Idaho Statesman and the Dayton Daily News and has been a daily reporter for 14 years.

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Daniela Brod
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Salmon 2: Living in the E.S.A.

Daniela Brod is the Johnson Creek Watershed Manager for the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services. She is responsible for coordinating jurisdictional activities that affect Johnson Creek, including land use and water quality management actions. She is responsible for managing the Bureau's floodplain land acquisition program and planning for multi-objective flood mitigation which includes water quality improvements and enhancement of fish and wildlife habitat. She has a B.S. in Biology and Environmental Studies from Tufts University and she is in the process of acquiring a Masters in Urban and Regional Planning from Portland State University.

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Jacob Brostoff
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

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George Brown
Event: Saturday, Small-Group Session #1, 12:15 p.m. -
Energy Options Today: Covering Alternatives and Renewables

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Susan Jane Brown
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Forests 1: Ecology and Politics of Northwest Forests

Susan Jane Brown graduated from the Northwestern School of Law of Lewis and Clark College with a Juris Doctorate and the Certificate in Environmental and Natural Resources Law, and is an active member of the Washington State Bar. For the past four years, she has worked extensively on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest monitoring timber sales and assisting in the preparation of more than twenty administrative appeals for timber sales on the GPNF, including analyzing virtually every timber sale environmental assessment on the GPNF since 1997. Susan Jane is actively involved in forest monitoring on national forests east of the Cascade crest in Oregon and Washington. Additionally, she is a past editor of Environmental Law, the nation's oldest and foremost environmental law review publication. She has written four law review articles on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, addressing issues such as the timber sale program and the Interstate 90 land exchange.

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James Bruggers
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
The Changing Face of Farms

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Dirk Bryant
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE CRAFT: Using GIS As a Source for Your Story

Dirk Bryant is director of Global Forest Watch, an international data and mapping network that combines on-the-ground knowledge with digital technology to provide accurate information about the world's forests. Dirk is working with nongovernment organizations and others to track where development is happening within forests, and collect and share data on the impacts of these activities. Dirk co-authored the first-ever global assessment of the status of frontier forests as well as the World Resources Institute (WRI) report, "Reefs at Risk: A Map-Based Indicator of Threats to the World's Coral Reefs," the first detailed global analysis of threats to coral reef ecosystems. Prior to joining WRI, Dirk conducted forest ecology field work in Belize for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was employed as a naturalist for Massachusetts Audubon and served as a Peace Corps fisheries volunteer in Senegal, West Africa. He received an M.S. in environmental management from Duke University.

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Denny Bschor
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Mt. St. Helens: Comeback from a Cataclysm

Denny Bschor is Director of Recreation, Heritage and Wilderness for the USDA Forest Service. He oversees policy development and implementation of recreation, heritage and wilderness programs in 155 national forests and 20 grasslands in 44 states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Denny served as Forest Supervisor of the 1.7-million-acre Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest in western Washington from January 1994 to November 1998. During that period, he was instrumental in leading one of the country's largest urban national forests toward increased awareness and protection of watershed, wildlife habitat and scenic recreation values. He previously led the public affairs and recreation and public services programs in the agency's Rocky Mountain Region, headquartered in Boulder, Colorado.

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Nick Budnick
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

Nick Budnick has spent the last two years at Portland newsweekly Willamette Week. A former intern for the Jack Anderson column in Washington, D.C., he worked for the Sacramento Bee, weekly Sacramento News & Review, and also covered the California State Legislature for the Recorder, a San Francisco legal paper.

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Jeff Burnside
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE LAND: Wildfires: Man, Nature and Journalists - Better Coverage of the Burning Issues

Jeff Burnside is a producer and reporter for the special projects unit at WTVJ in Miami. He created "EcoWatch," the station's year-long environmental awareness project that includes frequent newsreports, environmental investigations, TV specials, an EcoWatch web page, community projects, a classroom curriculum and an environmental tips guide.

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Mike Burton
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

Mike Burton is serving his second term as the elected executive officer of Metro, the regional government serving the greater Portland metropolitan area. Since taking office at Metro in January 1995, Mike has successfully implemented Metro's $135.6 million open space voter-approved bond measure to acquire 6,500 acres of natural areas, trails and properties along our rivers and streams for conservation and protection. In 1985, he was elected to the Oregon House of Representatives where he served five consecutive terms. In 1989, Mike served as Speaker Pro Tem of the House.

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Dick Caldwell
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Salmon 2: Living in the E.S.A.

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Maria Cantwell
Event: Friday, Opening Plenary, 8:45 a.m. -
Business, Environment and Defense: Can Technology Save the Planet?

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Richard Carson
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

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Duke Castle
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

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Hank Cauley
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Consumer Clout: How Purchasing Power Can Influence the Environment

Hank Cauley has been the executive director of the Forest Stewardship Council United States since 1999. The FSC is an international nonprofit organization that sets standards and accredits organizations to audit forest management and forest-related businesses in order to guarantee consumers that the wood they purchase comes from a sustainably managed forest. Before that, Hank founded Innovative Environmental Technologies, Inc., which established a sustainable timber harvesting business in Papua New Guinea.

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Pat Chandler
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Consumer Clout: How Purchasing Power Can Influence the Environment

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John Charles
Events:
1. Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Balancing the Books: Does Environmental Protection Really Promote Economic Growth?
2. Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

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Lou Clark
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Washington Park: A Sense of Place

Lou Clark is earth science information officer at the Oregon Department of Geology, responsible for translating the scientific information of the department into language that can be used by the public, government agencies, the private sector, and others. She appears on Portland TV and radio new programs, explaining earthquakes, landslides, floods, and other geologic events which are a regular part of Oregon life.

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Frank Clifford
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE CRAFT: Getting the Right Play for Your Story

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Jack Cohen
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE LAND: Wildfires: Man, Nature and Journalists - Better Coverage of the Burning Issues

Jack Cohen is a research physical scientist at the USDA Forest Service fire sciences laboratory in Montana. Now, he is developing the Structure Ignition Assessment Model, a method for assessing wildland fire threat to homes. He is one of the principal scientists involved in the international crown fire modeling experiment, NWT, Canada, where he is investigating the thermal characteristics of crown fires related to structure ignitions and fire spread.

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Christine Colasurdo
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Mt. St. Helens: Comeback from a Cataclysm

Christine Colasurdo is a freelance journalist and author. Her book, "Return to Spirit Lake: Journey through a Lost Landscape" (Sasquatch Books, 1997) discusses the natural history of Mount St. Helens and her childhood memories of visiting the area before the volcano began to reawaken in 1980. The 320-page book rekindles her early memories, her rediscovery of the landscape after the eruption and scientific research conducted in the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. Since the book was published, Colasurdo has given talks in California, Oregon and Washington and has written articles for Sierra, ORION, Audubon and other magazines. She also proposed and co-created an exhibit about Mount St. Helens at the Cowlitz County Historical Museum in Kelso called "Spirit Lake Remembered," featuring rare photographs and other historic material from the mountain before its cataclysmic eruption of May 18, 1980. As a freelance journalist, Colasurdo has written articles for the San Francisco Chronicle Book Review, Sunset, California Wild and other publications. She has a master's degree in English from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Michelle Cole
Events:
1. Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE FUTURE: Reporting on Consumption: (Not) Bringing It All Back Home
2. Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE NATION: God and Nature: The Rise of Religious Involvement in the Environment

Michelle Cole joined The Oregonian in June 1999 to fill a new beat on the newspaper's environmental team: Consumption and Values. The beat, broadly defined by intent, has led to stories that do not necessarily fit the more traditional "fish and critters" environmental beat. They include an examination of environmental education in public schools as well as the practice of environmental law and its effect on the culture. Prior to moving to Portland, Michelle spent four months with USA Today's database team and nine years in Idaho with The Idaho Statesman. Michelle received a master's degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1987.

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Marla Cone
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE GLOBE: Around the World in Ten Days

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Carol Craig
Events:
1. Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Native American Sovereignty and the Environment: What They Wouldn't Teach You in School
2. Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Spirit of the Salmon

Carol Craig is a Yakama tribal member who works as public information manager for the Yakama Nation fish and wildlife resource management program. She speaks to students of all levels as well as civic organizations about treaty rights, and gives the tribal perspective on restoring salmon in the Columbia River Basin. She also writes, edits and takes photographs for the monthly publication, Sin-Wit-Ki, which translates to "All Life On Earth."

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Courtney Cuff
Events:
1. Thursday, Day Tour -
Mt. St. Helens: Comeback from a Cataclysm
2. Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE LAND: Faded Jewels: The Future of Our National Parks

Courtney Cuff is Pacific region director for the National Parks Conservation Association. She began work March 1, 2001 and will continue the Pacific region's existing campaigns on parks, including Yosemite and the Presidio, as well as expand the office's desert parks agenda. Before joining NPCA, Courtney was the Legislative Director for Friends of the Earth. Prior to that, she served as co-creator and director of the Green Scissors Campaign, teaming fiscally conservative groups with environmental organizations to cut wasteful, environmentally harmful spending and subsidies from the federal budget. Courtney was the field director for the League of Conservation Voters 1998 Wisconsin Senate campaign and has worked on a number of U.S. House races. She has a BA, cum laude, from Wake Forest University.

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Clifton Curtis
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE GLOBE: Around the World in Ten Days

Clifton Curtis is director of the global toxics initiative at the World Wildlife Fund. He directs the international persistent organic pollutants (POPs) team, which addresses special science/policy initiatives in relation to the recently concluded, successful negotiation of a global POPs treaty. From 1991-98, Clifton was political advisor of the political and science division at Greenpeace International.

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Jeff Curtis
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Salmon 1: Dams, Hatcheries and Treaty Rights

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Charles Cushman
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE LAND: Fighting Back: The Western Wise Use Movement

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Michelle Dailey
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE CRAFT: Using GIS As a Source for Your Story

Michelle Dailey is a GIS analyst with Ecotrust, a nonprofit conservation organization. She has a degree in natural resources and fisheries and wildlife from the University of Minnesota. She is also a volunteer GIS analyst at Sea Resources Fish Hatchery in Chinook, Washington. Her work there includes developing GIS capacity of clients and developing custom GIS tools so individuals can use GIS for query and analysis without needing to be experts. She will assist Steven S. Ross during the hands-on portion of his online journalism workship, and will answer questions about Inforain and other on-line mapping resources.

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Sally Deneen
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Washington Park: A Sense of Place

Sally Deneen has covered such diverse topics as the world's fast-disappearing endangered plants, global climate change and the nation's shrinking wetlands as a contributor to E: The Environmental Magazine. A free-lance writer for the past decade, she has written for two dozen publications, including Organic Gardening, US News & World Report, Columbia Journalism Review. She is co-author of the new book, "Genetically Modified Food: 50 Things You Absolutely Must Know" (Rodale Press).

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Dick Dewey
Event: Thursday, Portland State University Poster Session, 6:00 p.m.

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Speros Doulos
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Salmon 1: Dams, Hatcheries and Treaty Rights

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Mike Dunne
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE NATION: Will Both the Environment and Environmental News Become Casualties of Terrorism, Too?

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Kathie Durbin
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

Kathie Durbin, an Oregon-based journalist, has covered environmental issues in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska since 1989. She is presently a special projects reporter for The Columbian in Vancouver, Wash., where she covers regional growth and environmental issues and the Columbia River Gorge. She is the author of two books on forest politics.

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Tom Dwyer
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge

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Randall Edwards
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE NATION: Laws without teeth? Is it Possible to Enforce the Nation's Environmental Laws?

Randall Edwards covers environment, energy and agriculture issues for the Ohio bureau of Capitolwire, an online news service with bureaus in five states. He is a contributing editor at Ohio Magazine, where he writes a monthly outdoor feature called "Field Trip," and previously was the environment reporter for the Columbus Dispatch. Randall has provided assistance in coordinating many SEJ regional conferences in Ohio.

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Tim Egan
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE NATION: Laws without teeth? Is it Possible to Enforce the Nation's Environmental Laws?

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Richard Ellis
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE NATION: Power to the People?: Is the Initiative Process out of Control?

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Rob Eure
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Balancing the Books: Does Environmental Protection Really Promote Economic Growth?

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Dan Fagin
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE NATION: Will Both the Environment and Environmental News Become Casualties of Terrorism, Too?

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Brodie Farquhar
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE LAND: Fighting Back: The Western Wise Use Movement

Mr. Brodie Farquhar is an environmental journalist with 27 years of experience covering natural resource issues in the drainages of the Arkansas, North and South Platte, San Pedro, Rio Grande, Gunnison, Republican, Snake and Columbia rivers. Brodie has won SPJ awards for in-depth reports on the Walla Walla River and the Army Corps of Engineers' abuse of wetlands. Now based with the Casper Star-Tribune in Wyoming, Brodie is currently reporting on the wolves and grizzlies of Yellowstone, rangeland issues and a chemical contamination investigation involving one of the nation's major manufacturers of tear gas.

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Alan Felsot
Event: Saturday, Reporters Workshop:
Working the Web, 2:15 p.m. (Pesticide resources)

Allan Felsot is currently a professor in the Department of Entomology at Washington State University. He obtained a bachelor's degree in biology from Tulane University (1972), an M.S. in entomology (insect physiology) from the University of Florida (1974) and a Ph.D. in entomology (pesticide chemistry) from Iowa State University (1978). He is currently a member of the Agrochemical and Environment Commission of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry.

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Erica Fernay
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Salmon 2: Living in the E.S.A.

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Kristian Foden-Vencil
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Salmon 2: Living in the E.S.A.

Kristian Foden-Vencil is the environmental reporter for Oregon Public Broadcasting in Portland. He has written for the environmental beat for three years, prior to which he freelanced for National Public Radio, The BBC, The Oregonian and many other organizations. He started his journalism career 13 years ago working for two newspapers in London, England.

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Donald Fontenot
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE GLOBE: Sitting In: Rising Civil Disobedience in the Environmental Movement

Donald Fontenot is a full-time volunteer for Cascadia Forest Alliance, concentrating on state land issues in Oregon. He has been involved with tree-sitting and roadblocking protests since 1998, and also helped establish the first tree-sit in the Tillamook State Forest earlier this year.

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Jane Foreman
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Forests 2: Urban Forests

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Pat Forgey
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Salmon 2: Living in the E.S.A.

Pat Forgey is an environment and business reporter at the News-Register in McMinnville, Oregon, and covered the environment for The Daily Astorian and as Northwest Oregon correspondent for The Oregonian. He grew up in Alaska and interned at the Anchorage Daily News and at his hometown paper, the Daily Sitka Sentinel.

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Dr. Jerry F. Franklin
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Forests 1: Ecology and Politics of Northwest Forests

Jerry Forest Franklin is a professor of ecosystem analysis at the University of Washington. Jerry studies natural forest ecosystems and their succession. Since 1993, he has been director of the Wind River Canopy Crane Research Facility in Washington, and has been land steward of the Rio Condor project in Chile since 1996. He has written or co-written more than 300 texts on forestry issues.

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Peter Frenzen
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Mt. St. Helens: Comeback from a Cataclysm

Peter Frenzen is monument scientist at the USDA Forest Service Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. As monument scientist, he is responsible for coordinating ongoing research, transferring research findings to visitor information programs and monitoring the recovery of plant and animal life following the 1980 eruptions. He received an MS in forest ecology and botany from Oregon State University. Peter will be leading the tour of the Hummocks trail on Mount St. Helens.

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Frank Fromherz
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE NATION: God and Nature: The Rise of Religious Involvement in the Environment

Frank Fromherz is director of the Office of Justice and Peace for the Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon. Frank contributed to the United States Catholic Conference (USCC) publication "Peace with God the Creator, Peace with All Creation," 1995, and serves on the national advisory committee for the USCC's Environmental Justice Program.

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Anita Gahimer
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

Anita Gahimer is executive director, Port of Skamania County. Her work involves building the Port's economic status. Anita participated in Washington state Governor Locke's recent trade mission to central Europe, and she is a director on the Washington state rural development council.

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Amy Gahran
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Keeping the Lights On: Who'll Be the Next California?

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Michel Gelobter
Event: Friday, Opening Plenary, 8:45 a.m. -
Business, Environment and Defense: Can Technology Save the Planet?

Michel Gelobter is the executive director of Redefining Progress, an activist think tank based in Oakland, Calif. Michel was formerly director of environmental quality and assistant commissioner for the New York City Department of Environmental Protection. He has also served as a Congressional Black Caucus Fellow with the Energy and Commerce Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. His present appointments include the Executive Council of the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council, and membership on the Clean Air Act Federal Advisory Committee and the board of the Natural Resources Defense Council.

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Christy George
Event: Thursday, Opening Reception and Buffet Dinner, 7:00 p.m., and
Friday, Welcome and Introductions, 8:30 a.m.

Christy George is Oregon Public Broadcasting's Marketplace Business and Environment Desk bureau chief. The Los Angeles-based program about business and global economics airs nationally. Christy also produces documentaries for OPB Radio and OPB-TV. Her program, "The Oregon Story: rural.com," premieres Nov. 6. She is a member of the SEJ Board of Directors.

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Glen Gilbert
Event: Saturday, Reception at the World Forestry Center, 5:00 p.m.

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Dr. Lynn Goldman
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE LAB: Tracking Disease: Exploring Possible Links Between Illness and Environmental Factors

Lynn Goldman, a pediatrician and an epidemiologist, is a professor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, where her areas of focus are environmental health policy and children's environmental health. She was assistant administrator in the EPA's office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances from 1994-98. During her term, the EPA expanded right-to-know under the Toxics Release Inventory and overhauled the nation's pesticides laws. Her MD is from the University of California, San Francisco.

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Nathan Good
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Green Buildings

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Kevin Gorman
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

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Zeke Grader
Events:
1. Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Consumer Clout: How Purchasing Power Can Influence the Environment
2. Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Water Rights and the ESA: On a collision course?

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Elizabeth Grossman
Event: Sunday, Plenary Session 8:30 a.m. -
Lewis and Clark: The Landscape and Their Legacy

Elizabeth Grossman is co-editor of "Shadow Cat: Encountering the American Mountain Lion" (Sasquatch Books, 1999) and author of "Watershed: The Undamming of America" which will be published by Counterpoint Press in the spring of 2002. She is also writing a "Lewis and Clark Trail Adventure Travel Guide" for Sierra Club Books. A native of New York City, she has a B.A. cum laude in literature from Yale University, and now lives in Portland.

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Ed Guerrant
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE GLOBE: Peril in Paradise: The Ecological Crisis on Pacific Islands

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David E. Haddock
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Water Rights and the ESA: On a collision course?

David Haddock is an attorney with Pacific Legal Foundation, a nonprofit, tax-exempt public interest law firm which was formed in 1973 to litigate nationwide in defense of individual and economic freedoms and to represent the public in support of sound and limited government. David's litigation practice focuses on all aspects of environmental law, including such areas as water law, wetlands, endangered species, and public and private land use.

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Lt. Chris Haley
Event: Thursday, Day Tour - Pacific Frontier

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Jack Hamann
Event: Thursday, 9:00 p.m. - Welcome to the Wild Northwest

Jack Hamann is a Seattle-based documentary producer and author. Between 1991-99, Jack was a correspondent and producer for CNN's Environment Unit, where assignments took him to places like Nepal, New Zealand, Cuba, Siberia and the Arctic Ocean. An assignment in Montana triggered a dispute that recently landed in the U.S. Supreme Court (Berger v. Hanlon). Jack has produced a 12 television documentaries, including "The Russia Factor" for CNN, and "Green Plans," "Hot Potatoes" and "Faith & Fear" for PBS. Jack has written extensively for CNN.com, and reported for Outside Radio and the Expedia Radio Network. His awards include nine Emmys and several gold and silver medals at national and international film festivals. Jack is currently working on a novel set in Alaska's Pribilof Islands.

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Jeff Hammarlund
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE NATION: God and Nature: The Rise of Religious Involvement in the Environment

Jeff Hammarlund has focused on environmental, energy and natural resource issues for over 25 years in a variety of roles. Since 1995 he has been a Senior Research Fellow and Adjunct Associate Professor at the Mark Hatfield School of Government at Portland State University where he teaches graduate courses on Northwest energy policy, the politics and science of salmon recovery, the Endangered Species Act and environmental ethics. He was also president of the board of the Earth and Spirit Council for four years. He remains a senior advisor for the group, chairs its political affairs committee and regularly speaks to churches, environmental, business and civic groups.

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Dr. Allen Hammond
Event: Friday, Opening Plenary, 8:45 a.m. -
Business, Environment and Defense: Can Technology Save the Planet?

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Tom Happynook
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Culture Renewed: The Return of Aboriginal Whaling in the Pacific Northwest

Tom Happynook (Maaksisanap) - A hereditary whaling Chief from the Huu-ay-aht Nation on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Tom is also the founder and president of the World Council of Whalers, a worldwide organization of indigenous whaling cultures.

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Blaine Harden
Event: Sunday, Plenary Session 8:30 a.m. -
Lewis and Clark: The Landscape and Their Legacy

Blane Harden has been a reporter for 23 years, covering government, environment and war. He worked at the Washington Post from 1978-1999 and is now a national roving correspondent at The New York Times. He has written two books: "Africa: Dispatches From a Fragile Continent" (Norton, 1990) and "A River Lost: The Life and Death of the Columbia" (Norton, 1996).

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Suzan Shown Harjo
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Native American Sovereignty and the Environment: What They Wouldn't Teach You in School

Suzan Shown Harjo, Cheyenne and Hodulgee Muscogee, is a poet, writer, lecturer and policy advocate who has helped Native peoples recover more than 1 million acres of land and numerous sacred places. She is president and executive director of The Morning Star Institute, a national Native American rights organization. She developed key federal law including the 1990 Native American Graves and Repatriation Act, and she is a columnist for Indian Country Today, a Native American newspaper.

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Mitchell Hartman
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Green Buildings

Mitchell Hartman is managing editor of Oregon Business, a monthly magazine based in Portland. He previously spent seven years as a senior editor and morning host at public radio's "Marketplace" in Los Angeles. He also directed Marketplace's Portland-based business and environment bureau, whose bureau chief is Oregon Public Broadcasting's Christy George. Mitchell has a long-standing interest in architecture and historic preservation. He will be launching a new annual building and office design award at Oregon Business magazine in 2002.

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Hal Harvey
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Keeping the Lights On: Who'll Be the Next California?

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Kim Hatfield
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Salmon 2: Living in the E.S.A.

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Jan Hauser
Event: Friday, Opening Plenary, 8:45 a.m. -
Business, Environment and Defense: Can Technology Save the Planet?

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John Heilprin
Events:
1. Friday, Lunch and Plenary Session, 12:00 p.m. -
The Bush Agenda
2. Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE NATION: Laws without teeth? Is it Possible to Enforce the Nation's Environmental Laws?

John Heilprin grew up in Washington, D.C., where he has been the national staff writer assigned to cover the environment for The Associated Press for the past year. He is a University of Colorado graduate and former Colorado Outward Bound School mountaineering instructor, and last year was a member of a Portland-based American expedition trying to climb K2. He has been a reporter since 1989, writing for newspapers in New Hampshire, South Carolina and Utah.

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David Helvarg
Event: Thursday, Day Tour - Pacific Frontier

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John Henrikson
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Green Buildings

John Henrikson is associate editor at The Bulletin in Bend, where he directs projects and state coverage. He has worked as a journalist in Oregon for 13 years, covering the environment, growth and local and state government. He was a 2000 journalism fellow at the University of Michigan, where he studied sustainable environment and economics.

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Paul Henson
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE GLOBE: Peril in Paradise: The Ecological Crisis on Pacific Islands

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Richard Hill
Events:
1. Thursday, Day Tour - Pacific Frontier
2. Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 am -
THE CRAFT: Science Writing Workshop: Selling the Story with Science

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Mike Houck
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Washington Park: A Sense of Place

Mike Houck is chairman of the Urban Natural Resources Working Group. Since 1982, Mike has served as the Audubon Society of Portland's urban naturalist and as director of the Society's Metropolitan Wildlife Refuge System project. He is co-editor of Wild in the City, a guide to Portland's natural areas, a natural history guide to the Portland metropolitan region, and has authored numerous papers on Oregon's land use planning program as it relates to natural resource protection.

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Kerry Howard
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE FUTURE: Last Wilderness

Kerry Howard has worked for the state of Alaska for the past 18 years on natural resource issues, and previously with the U.S. Forest Service, Environmental Protection Agency, and Sealaska, a Native regional corporation. She is currently based in the Governor's Office and, among other duties, serves as the lead coordinator on transboundary mining issues, including an ongoing environmental assessment by British Columbia into reopening of the controversial Tulsequah Chief mine near the Taku River.

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Peter Huhtala
Event: Thursday, Day Tour - Pacific Frontier

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Dr. Christina L. Hulbe
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE GLOBE: The Breaking Point: A Critical Exploration of Some of the Worst-Case Scenarios in a Warmer World

Christina L. Hulbe is assistant professor of geology at Portland State University. Christina, who left the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center this summer to join the Portland State University faculty, is a glaciologist whose focus is the behavior of the West Antarctic ice sheets from the peak of the last ice age until now. She uses computer models to simulate glacial movement and has closely studied the relationship of climate and ice movement.

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Chip Humphrey
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Willamette River: National Heritage River and Superfund Site

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Dave Hunnicutt
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

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Brent Hunsberger
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Willamette River: National Heritage River and Superfund Site

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Ed Hunt
Events:
1. Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE CRAFT: Using GIS As a Source for Your Story
2. Saturday, Reporters Workshop: Working the Web, 2:15 p.m.
(Bioregional News Services Resources)

Ed Hunt is a professional environmental journalist; he has spent most of the last 10 years covering salmon, forest, water and land use issues in the Northwest for the Tidepool news service and other publications.

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Peter Illyn
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE NATION: God and Nature: The Rise of Religious Involvement in the Environment

Peter Illyn started Christians for Environmental Stewardship in 1996 to counter attacks upon the Endangered Species Act orchestrated by the 104th Congress. He also serves as vice-president of the Christian Environmental Council and sits on the board of directors of the White Cloud Council.

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Orna Izakson
Events:
1. Thursday, Day Tour -
Forests 1: Ecology and Politics of Northwest Forests
2. Sunday, Post-Conference Tour to the Snake River Dams and the Columbia River's Hanford Reach

Orna Izakson has covered forests, fish and science at newspapers throughout the U.S. since 1993. She is currently a free-lance environmental writer and a contributing editor at Eugene Weekly in Oregon's southern Willamette Valley. Her work has appeared in publications including E: The Environmental Magazine, Mountainfreak, Pacific Fishing, Utne Reader online, Bangor Daily News, High Country News, The Bear Deluxe and Cascadia Times.

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Ben Jacklet
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Willamette River: National Heritage River and Superfund Site

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Chris James
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

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Dr. Anthony Janetos
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE GLOBE: The Breaking Point: A Critical Exploration of Some of the Worst-Case Scenarios in a Warmer World

Anthony Janetos joined World Resources Institute in 1999 as senior vice president and chief of programs. Previously, he worked as senior scientist for the land cover and land use change program in NASA's Office of Earth Science, and was program scientist for the Landsat 7 mission. He was a co-chair of the U.S. National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change, and a lead author in the IPCC special report on land use change and forestry.

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Liu Jianqiang
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: The Chinese Century: What will the world's most populous nation do with the environment?

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Craig N. Johnston
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Willamette River: National Heritage River and Superfund Site

Craig N. Johnston is Professor of Law at Lewis & Clark College's Northwestern School of Law. Before joining the faculty in 1991, Johnston worked in private practice and served as a staff lawyer with the U.S.Environmental Protection Agency in Boston. There, he worked on major enforcement matters under both the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). In Portland, he founded the environmental section of the Perkins Coie law firm and represented clients on compliance and litigation matters. Professor Johnston co-authored a casebook on Superfund law used in law schools across the country. His co-author was Professor Jeffrey G. Miller of Pace University School of Law in New York. Professor Johnston is also the main organizer of Run America 2002, a fundraising endeavor pursuant to which a group of friends is running a relay from Tillamook, Oregon, to Boston, Massachusetts.

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Roberta Jortner
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Salmon 2: Living in the E.S.A.

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Ma Jun
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: The Chinese Century: What will the world's most populous nation do with the environment?

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John Karpinski
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

John S. Karpinski is an environmental lawyer from Washington state. His more notable cases include: representing the Native Forest Council in the spotted owl case; successfully suing the National Marine Fisheries Service to force promulgation of the salmon-protective "4(d)" rules; filing the first appeal to the Growth Board under Washington's Growth Management Act; and he won two Washington Supreme Court cases on the same day, Currens v. Sleek, and Concerned Ratepayers Association v. Clark Public Utilities. He serves as vice-president of the Washington Environmental Council.

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Paul Kaufman
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Keeping the Lights On: Who'll Be the Next California?

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Byron Kennard
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Balancing the Books: Does Environmental Protection Really Promote Economic Growth?

Byron Kennard, founder and Executive Director of the Center for Small Business and the Environment, served as national vice chair of Sun Day, 1978, national chair of Earth Day 1980 and as special consultant to the EPA Administrator for Earth Day 1990. Recently, Byron has worked as senior environmental advisor to Lisboa Associates, a small, woman-owned, minority-owned public affairs and communications firm in Washington, D.C. He is the author of "Nothing Can Be Done, Everything Is Possible," a book of essays on social and political change, and wrote the musical plays "Out of Style" and "Sweet Talk."

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Steve Kirsch
Event: Friday, Opening Plenary, 8:45 a.m. -
Business, Environment and Defense: Can Technology Save the Planet?

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Keith Klein
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Our Nuclear Legacy: Cleaning Up After the Arms Race

Keith A. Klein is manager of the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland, Wash., office. He is responsible for cleanup of the Hanford site, a former Defense Department location with a nuclear "legacy." Keith is trained in the nuclear fuel cycle, from power generation to weapons facility and material disposition.

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Roy Koch
Event: Friday, Welcome and Introductions, 8:30 a.m.

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Margaret Kriz
Event: Saturday, Small-Group Session #2, 12:15 p.m. -
EPA PIOs Roundtable

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Clay J. Landry
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Water Rights and the ESA: On a collision course?

Clay J. Landry is a research associate at PERC (Political Economy Research Center), a public policy research institute that specializes in market approaches to natural resource management. He also is the founder and principal of WestWater Research, a water marketing firm. Clay is the author of "Saving Our Streams Through Water Markets: A Practical Guide," a handbook for environmentalists, agency officials, ranchers, farmers, and others who want to use water markets to protect fish and other wildlife. Clay helped establish the Montana Water Trust, a nonprofit organization dedicated to purchasing water for environmental needs.

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Craig Lesley
Event: Sunday, Plenary Session 8:30 a.m. -
Lewis and Clark: The Landscape and Their Legacy

Craig Lesley is the Hallie Ford chair of creative writing at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. Craig is author of four novels, "Storm Riders," "The Sky Fisherman," "Winterkill" and "Riversong." He is also editor of Talking Leaves: Contemporary Native American Short Stories and Dreamers and Desperadoes: Contemporary Fiction of the American West.

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Jane Braxton Little
Event: Wednesday, Pre-Conference Ice-Breaker, 4:30 p.m.

Jane Braxton Little is a freelance journalist covering forest and other natural resource issues from Plumas County, Calif. She has won two consecutive Society of Professional Journalism awards for consumer and environmental affairs reporting, and several state and national newspaper awards. Her writing and photographs have appeared in numerous national magazines, including Audubon, Utne Reader, American Forests, Wilderness, High Country News, Hope and Forest Magazine.

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Gary Livingstone
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE FUTURE: Last Wilderness

Gary Livingstone is president and chief executive officer of the Mining Association of British Columbia, one of the province's longest established trade associations, representing all major mineral producers. He will present industry's view on the environmental impact of mining, including a review of mines already operating near the B.C./Alaska border, and will discuss the expectation of greater exploration and activity in the region following the election of a pro-business government in Victoria.

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Miguel Llanos
Event: Saturday, Small-Group Session #1, 12:15 p.m. -
Energy Options Today: Covering Alternatives and Renewables

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Bruce Lovelin
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Salmon 1: Dams, Hatcheries and Treaty Rights

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Roy W. Lowe
Event: Thursday, Day Tour - Pacific Frontier

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Bill Lunch
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE NATION: Power to the People?: Is the Initiative Process out of Control?

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Charles "Chuck" Lundy
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE LAND: Faded Jewels: The Future of Our National Parks

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Bill Mackenzie
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

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Jeff Mapes
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE NATION: Power to the People?: Is the Initiative Process out of Control?

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Lloyd Marbet
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE NATION: Power to the People?: Is the Initiative Process out of Control?

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Richard Mauer
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE LAND: Drilling the Midnight Wilderness: Oil and Gas Exploration in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

Rich Mauer has been special projects editor of the Anchorage Daily News since March 1997. Prior to that, he was city editor for four years. Mauer joined the Daily News in 1983 and became the paper's principal investigative reporter. He was a reporter and the project coordinator for the Pulitzer Prize-winning series about suicide and despair in the Alaska Bush, "A People in Peril."

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Robert Mazurek
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Consumer Clout: How Purchasing Power Can Influence the Environment

Robert Mazurek has been a science writer and researcher with the Monterey Bay Aquarium since March 2001. Before joining the Aquarium, Robert was the science writer for California State University-Monterey Bay and has written free-lance science articles for publications such as Popular Science, Smithsonian, The Boston Globe, New Scientist, and Rodale's Scuba Diving Magazine. Before starting his science writing career, Robert taught marine science at the Newfound Harbor Marine Institute in the Florida Keys and the Santa Cruz County Outdoor School in California. Robert also worked as a biologist for the University of California's Predatory Bird Research Group and lead a team that released six peregrine falcons into Lake Tahoe Basin National Forest.

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Robert McClure
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Water Rights and the ESA: On a collision course?

Robert McClure has covered the environment for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer for the past two years. He is a veteran of more than a dozen years on the environment beat.

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Mary Kyle McCurdy
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

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Shelley Means
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE NATION: God and Nature: The Rise of Religious Involvement in the Environment

Shelley Means is the environmental justice associate at the Washington Association of Churches. She previously worked as tribal liaison for the Seattle Water Department, Director of the Native American Network and the Snoqualmie Falls Preservation Project.

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David Mears
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Our Nuclear Legacy: Cleaning Up After the Arms Race

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Tom Melanson
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge

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Jerry Meninick
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Spirit of the Salmon

Jerry Meninick is chairman of the Yakama Tribal Council since 1994. He has also been a rancher, businessman, fisherman and an employee of the Yakima Cultural Resources Program. He was raised in the Suhtus (Satus) area of what is now the Yakama Reservation in Washington state, and his great-grandfather was one of the representatives of the Yakama Nation who signed a treaty with the U.S. government in 1855.

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Jim Midaugh
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Salmon 2: Living in the E.S.A.

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Alison Mielke
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

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David Milarch
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Forests 2: Urban Forests

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Robert Miller
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Native American Sovereignty and the Environment: What They Wouldn't Teach You in School

Bob Miller is Shawnee and professor of law at the law school of Lewis Clark University in Portland. Bob serves as an appellate judge for the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon, as well as for the Northwest Inter-tribal Court System, and is on the boards of the National Indian Child Welfare Association, the Oregon Native American Business Entrepreneurial Network, the Eastern Oregon University Foundation, and is a past chair of the Oregon State Bar, Indian law section.

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Pam Miller
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE LAND: Drilling the Midnight Wilderness: Oil and Gas Exploration in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

Pamela Anne Miller has been an independent consultant for Arctic Connections in Anchorage since 1996, writing on Arctic oil environmental issues for non-profit organizations including Alaska Wilderness League, Defenders of Wildlife, Greenpeace and the Natural Resources Defense Council. Pamela has also been a guide for informational trips in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska.

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Scott Miller
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Mt. St. Helens: Comeback from a Cataclysm

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Michael Milstein
Events:
1. Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE LAND: Faded Jewels: The Future of Our National Parks
2. Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 am -
THE CRAFT: Science Writing Workshop: Selling the Story with Science

Michael Milstein has covered natural resources and public lands for The Oregonian since 2000. For the previous decade, he covered Yellowstone National Park, wildlife and science for The Billings Gazette. He has won several awards for environment and science writing and completed fellowships at the University of Colorado and the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole.

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Russell Mittermeier
Event: Friday, 7:30 p.m., Keynote Speaker

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Terry Mock
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Forests 2: Urban Forests

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Raymond Neutra
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE LAB: Tracking Disease: Exploring Possible Links Between Illness and Environmental Factors

Raymond Richard Neutra is chief of the division of environmental and occupational disease control for the California Department of Health Services. The division is responsible for doing investigations and providing technical assistance and advice to state and county officials with regard to occupational and environmental electric and magnetic fields.

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Fred Nilsen
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Washington Park: A Sense of Place

Fred Nilsen manages Hoyt Arboretum and Forest Park in Portland. He is a botanic supervisor for the city of Portland. He has also helped start the citizens' interest groups Friends of Forest Park and the Hoyt Arboretum Friends.

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Dr. Elliott A. Norse
Event: Thursday, Day Tour - Pacific Frontier

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Gale Norton
Event: Friday, Lunch and Plenary Session, 12:00 p.m. -
The Bush Agenda

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Jim O'Hara
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE LAB: Tracking Disease: Exploring Possible Links Between Illness and Environmental Factors

Jim O'Hara is executive director of Health-Track. Jim was formerly Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. He was associate commissioner for public affairs at the Food and Drug Administration. Jim was also a contributor to the FDA's article in The Journal of the American Medical Association on the improvement of drug approval times in the U.S. He has more than 17 years experience as a reporter, and is a Knight Fellow at Stanford University. He received his master's degree from the University of Chicago.

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Rachael Paschal Osborn
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Water Rights and the ESA: On a collision course?

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Andrea Otanez
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE CRAFT: Getting the Right Play for Your Story

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Dr. Jonathan T. Overpeck
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE GLOBE: The Breaking Point: A Critical Exploration of Some of the Worst-Case Scenarios in a Warmer World

Jonathan Overpeck is the director of the Institute for the Study of Planet Earth at the University of Arizona. His research focuses on studying past climate and ecosystem change with a goal of understanding what changes might take place in the future.

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Rod Park
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

Rod Park is chair of the Metro Council community planning committee in Portland. He is a farmer and a native Oregonian who says the conversion of prime farm land into urban uses is one of his top concerns.

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Vince Patton
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Washington Park: A Sense of Place

Vince Patton is an environmental reporter on KGW-TV in Portland. He has also been a reporter and anchor at KAKE-TV in Wichita, Kan., and WFAA-TV in Dallas. He also served as managing editor for two years.

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Natalie Pawelski
Event: Friday, Lunch and Plenary Session, 12:00 p.m. -
The Bush Agenda

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Ron Pernick
Event: Saturday, Small-Group Session #1, 12:15 p.m. -
Energy Options Today: Covering Alternatives and Renewables

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Steve Perry
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE FUTURE: Earth Abides -- But Where Does That Leave the Rest of Us?

Steve Perry is currently the science fiction, fantasy and horror book reviewer for The Oregonian. He is currently working on his 50th novel. He wrote for "Batman: The Animated Series" during its first Emmy award-winning season, and during the second season, one of his scripts was nominated for an Emmy for Outstanding Writing. His novelization of "Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire" spent 10 weeks on The New York Times Bestseller List, and all six of his collaborative novels for Tom Clancy's Net Force series have made the NY Times list. He has also taught writing classes at the University of Washington in Seattle.

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Bill Pickell
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE GLOBE: Sitting In: Rising Civil Disobedience in the Environmental Movement

William Pickell is general manager of the Washington Contract Loggers Association for the past 12 years. His work involves lobbying for the lumber and lumber-related industries. William spent 17 years as head of his own logging company, operating both tower and mechanized logging sides.

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Allen V. Pinkham, Sr.
Event: Sunday, Plenary Session 8:30 a.m. -
Lewis and Clark: The Landscape and Their Legacy

Allen V. Pinkham, Sr. is National Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Council Tribal Liaison with the Nez Perce Tribe, Northern Idaho Indian Agency. He provides information, communications and coordination between all the tribes associated with Lewis and Clark and organizations, states and federal agencies planning projects and activities during the period 2003 to 2006. He is also co-author of "Salmon and His People, a nature guidebook on fish and fishing in Nez Perce culture", published in March 1999 by Confluence Press. He currently serves as vice-chairman of Clearwater-Snake Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Committee.

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John Pitney
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE NATION: God and Nature: The Rise of Religious Involvement in the Environment

John Pitney has been a pastor for 27 years, currently at the First United Methodist Church in Eugene, Oregon. In 1986, he began working with rural church networks on issues raised during the farm crisis. Most recently, Pitney and his congregation have addressed global warming, energy stewardship and how to live faithfully in a society where we have and use too much.

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Ernie Platt
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

Ernie Platt is the owner of Ernest E. Platt and Associates, a real estate development consulting firm in Portland. He also serves as the director of local government affairs for the Homebuilders Association of Metro Portland. He is a past president of the HBAMP and serves on its board of directors. He is also the vice president/secretary of the Oregon Building Industry Association, and is also a member of the board of directors of the National Association of Homebuilders.

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Joe Poracsky
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Forests 2: Urban Forests

Joseph Poracsky is director of the Cartographic Center in the geography department at Portland State University, where he has been teaching since 1983. He and his students have been involved in a variety of local inventory and analysis activities including: natural areas mapping and GIS development for Metro's Metropolitan Greenspaces Program. In addition, Joseph has been a member of the Oregon Urban and Community Forestry Council for nine years and just completed eight years on the city of Portland's Urban Forestry Commission, the last four as chair.

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Jerry Powell
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE FUTURE: High Tech Trash: How to Cover America's Newest Toxic Waste Crisis

Jerry Powell is the editor of several recycling periodicals, including E-Scrap News, a monthly trade newsletter focusing on the management of used electronics. In addition, Jerry edits Resource Recycling, the monthly business magazine and two other newsletters. Prior to launching his editing career 20 years ago, Jerry provided recycling consulting service and managed a recycling company which he founded in 1969 as a graduate student at Portland State University.

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David Pray
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE CRAFT: Using GIS As a Source for Your Story

David Pray is a GIS analyst with the Alaska Conservation GIS Support Center. David holds a B.S. in environmental studies from the University of New York at Buffalo. David spent two years working as a contract employee with the U.S. Geological Survey in Anchorage as a digital data production analyst. David is currently finishing his M.S. in environmental science from Alaska Pacific University. His thesis involves investigating patterns of vascular plant species richness in Alaska. The Alaska Conservation GIS Support Center produces discrete, issue-specific GIS products to advance the conservation perspective on priority issues, provide hands-on training to conservation activists, and provides technical assistance and support to conservation organizations who have limited GIS capacity of their own. The Conservation GIS Support Center has been working to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and maps from the center have been used by the Washington Post and other publications this year.

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Larry Pynn
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE FUTURE: Last Wilderness

Larry Pynn writes on environmental issues for The Vancouver Sun, British Columbia's major daily newspaper. He travelled the Stikine River during research for his first book, "The Forgotten Trail," published in 1996, and explored several remote areas of Southeast Alaska for his second book, "Last Stands," published last year by Oregon State University Press.

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Irene Radford
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE FUTURE: Earth Abides -- But Where Does That Leave the Rest of Us?

Irene Radford combines a love of medieval history with a fascination for the paranormal in her books. She is the author of the "Dragon Nimbus" series and the "Merlin's Descendants" series, both published by DAW Books. A new series, "The Story of the Stargods," is currently scheduled to debut in February 2002.

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Paul Raeburn
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE CRAFT: Science Writing Workshop: Selling the Story with Science

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Janet Raloff
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE GLOBE: The Breaking Point: A Critical Exploration of Some of the Worst-Case Scenarios in a Warmer World

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Jeanne Rebstock
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE CRAFT: Using GIS As a Source for Your Story

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Len Reed
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE CRAFT: Getting the Right Play for Your Story

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Derek Reiber
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

Derek Reiber is managing editor of the Tidepool.org bioregional news service, where he writes on sustainability and green business issues as well as other regional topics. The former Western Washington University graduate also worked as the environmental reporter at the Roseburg, Ore. News-Review.

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Joyce Reinig
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States

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John Reynolds
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE LAND: Faded Jewels: The Future of Our National Parks

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Jacques A. Rivard
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: The Chinese Century: What will the world's most populous nation do with the environment?

Jacques Rivard, a native of the French province of Quebec, has been reporting for the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. on the environment for seventeen years. He received a Nieman fellowship in 1995-96 for a year of specialized environmental studies at Harvard University. He has been on the board of the Society of Environmental Journalism since 1997.

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Linda Roach
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 am -
THE CRAFT: Science Writing Workshop: Selling the Story with Science

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Roby Roberts
Event: Saturday, Small-Group Session #1, 12:15 p.m. -
Energy Options Today: Covering Alternatives and Renewables

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Lance Robertson
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Forests 1: Ecology and Politics of Northwest Forests

Lance Robertson covered natural resources, the environment, wildland fires and energy issues for The Register-Guard in Eugene, Ore., from 1989 to mid-2001. He now works for Eugene's public utility and is pursuing free-lance writing opportunities as well as a book project.

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Erik Robinson
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Mt. St. Helens: Comeback from a Cataclysm

Erik Robinson has covered the environment beat for The Columbian in Vancouver, Wash., since February 1999.

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Mark Rodekohr
Event: Saturday, Reporters Workshop:
Working the Web, 2:15 p.m. (Energy Resources)

Mark Rodekohr is chair of the Energy Information Administrationís (EIA) information products and services committee, which manages, maintains and develops standards for the EIA Web site.

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Paul Rogers
Events:
1. Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE FUTURE: High Tech Trash: How to Cover America's Newest Toxic Waste Crisis (moderator)
2. Introduction of Keynote Speaker, Friday, 7:30 p.m.

Paul Rogers is the resources and environment writer for the San Jose Mercury News, and has covered coastal issues and the environment beat for 10 years. He was part of the Mercury News team that won the 1990 Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Loma Prieta earthquake, and is the 2001 recipient of the Sierra Club's David R. Brower Award for excellence in environmental journalism. A lecturer at the UC-Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, his work has appeared in the Washington Post, Miami Herald, Seattle Times, Detroit Free Press, Chicago Tribune and other newspapers.

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Craig Rosebraugh
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE GLOBE: Sitting In: Rising Civil Disobedience in the Environmental Movement

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Kelly Ross
Events:
1. Thursday, Day Tour -
Sprawl 1: Fencing in Sprawl: A Tale of Two States
2. Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

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Steven Sander Ross
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE CRAFT: Using GIS As a Source for Your Story

Steven Sander Ross teaches at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, where he is now an associate professor of professional practice, specializing in new media and computer-assisted reporting. He runs the school's science-writing sequence, and coordinates the school's joint degree program for earth-science writers with Columbia's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. He is also co-director of the Institute for Analytical Journalism. Steven graduated from Columbia with an M.S. in journalism in 1970, after earning his B.S. in physics at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1969. He has written 18 books, including one on statistics. Since 1994, he has been working with Don Middleberg to conduct the nation's largest surveys of journalists' use of online services, including (but not limited to) the World Wide Web (the latest results can be seen here). In February 1998, he was listed among the nation's top 50 "names to know" in new media by Online Journalism Review.

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Sandra Mims Rowe
Event: Thursday, Opening Reception and Buffet Dinner, 7:00 p.m.

Sandy Rowe is editor of The Oregonian in Portland, the largest newspaper in the Northwest with a daily circulation of 360,000. The newspaper won the Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting in 1999 and a prize for feature writing in 2001. Sandy is past president of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, and a member of the Pulitzer Prize board. She is also chair of the Knight Foundation Journalism Advisory board.

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Jeanne Roy
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE FUTURE: Reporting on Consumption: (Not) Bringing It All Back Home

Jeanne Roy is co-founder and director of education at the Northwest Earth Institute. Jeanne led the teams that developed NWEI's discussion courses Voluntary Simplicity and Choices for Sustainable Living. An environmental educator for over 30 years, Jeanne founded Recycling Advocates and, in the early 1990s, wrote a weekly Reduce, Reuse, Recycle column in Oregon newspapers.

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Dick Russell
Events:
1. Thursday, Day Tour - Pacific Frontier
2. Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Culture Renewed: The Return of Aboriginal Whaling in the Pacific Northwest

Dick Russell is author of "Eye of the Whale: From Baja to Siberia with the World's Largest Mammal" (Simon & Schuster, August 2001) and two other books: "The Man Who knew Too Much" (1992) and "Black Genius: And the American Experience" (1998). Dick spent the better part of three years fighting for stronger regulations to protect the endangered Atlantic striped bass. Dick has served since 1986 as a contributing editor for the Amicus Journal, the quarterly publication of the Natural Resources Defense Council. Dick has also been a staff writer in the Hollywood bureau of TV Guide Magazine (1977-79), and a staff reporter for Sports Illustrated (1969-70) in New York. His free-lance articles have appeared in numerous publications, ranging from the Los Angeles Times Book Review to the Village Voice.

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Don Sampson
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Salmon 1: Dams, Hatcheries and Treaty Rights

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Peter Santucci
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE FUTURE: Reporting on Consumption: (Not) Bringing It All Back Home

Peter Santucci is managing editor of Seattle-based Washington CEO magazine. As a seminary graduate, his approach to conservation issues includes not only business and environmental concerns, but theological ones as well.

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Susan Saul
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge

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Deborah Schoch
Events:
1. Friday, Lunch and Plenary Session, 12:00 p.m. -
The Bush Agenda
2. Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE CRAFT: How to Make Environmental Stories Resonate

Deborah Schoch is an environmental writer at the Los Angeles Times, specializing in natural resources and public lands. A journalist for 22 years, she started at a small weekly in rural New York and later worked in New England and New York, covering the environment and politics. She joined the Times as a staff writer in 1990. Schoch was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1999-2000. She is a vice president of the Society of Environmental Journalists.

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Rick Schulberg
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

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Jeff Shaffer
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE FUTURE: Earth Abides -- But Where Does That Leave the Rest of Us?

Jeffrey Shaffer is a columnist for The Christian Science Monitor and a radio commentator for Oregon Public Broadcasting. His collection of short fiction, titled "It Came With the House," was a finalist for the 1998 Small PressBook award in the humor category, and one of the stories was selected for inclusion in the 11th edition of Year's Best Fantasy & Horror.

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David Shaw
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Forests 1: Ecology and Politics of Northwest Forests

David Shaw has been working in forests of the Pacific Northwest since the 1980s, mostly in aspects of forest biology and ecology, especially with regard to "forest pests" and their role in forest ecosystems. David began working on birds, mistletoes, plants and other organisms in the canopy crane project in 1991.

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Robert Sheckley
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE FUTURE: Earth Abides -- But Where Does That Leave the Rest of Us?

Robert Sheckley's speculative fiction writing career has spanned six decades. He has produced more than five dozen books, hundreds of short stories and numerous scripts for radio, TV and films. His first novel, "Immortality, Inc.," was produced as the movie "Freejack" starring Emilio Estevez, Mick Jagger and Renee Russo.

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Rachel Shimshak
Events: Friday, Opening Plenary, 8:45 a.m. -
Business, Environment and Defense: Can Technology Save the Planet?
2. Saturday, Small-Group Session #1, 12:15 p.m. -
Energy Options Today: Covering Alternatives and Renewables

Rachel Shimshak has been the director of the Renewable Northwest Project since its inception in 1994. Previously, Rachel was the policy director for the Massachusetts Division of Energy Resources where she worked on electricity, natural gas, oil, conservation, renewables and emergency planning issues.

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Scott Silver
Events: 1. Thursday, Day Tour -
Mt. St. Helens: Comeback from a Cataclysm
2. Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE LAND: Faded Jewels: The Future of Our National Parks

Scott Silver has worked as founder and executive director of Wild Wilderness since 1991. Wild Wilderness is a non-profit environmental organization that seeks to ensure that wilderness areas, roadless areas and other areas now substantially free of development will continue to provide outstanding opportunities for high quality, non-motorized recreation. Scott was senior scientist or staff scientist with several prominent biotechnology companies and has made significant contributions in the fields of large scale enzymology and bio-rational insect control. Silver received his honours degree from the University of Manchester, England, in 1975.

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Sam Sirkin
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

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Michael Skeels
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE NATION: Will Both the Environment and Environmental News Become Casualties of Terrorism, Too?

Michael Skeels is director of the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory, and was director of the Oregon State Health Division from 1990 to 1994. Michael is a clinical professor at the Oregon Health Sciences University School of Medicine, and is a past president of the Association of Public Health Laboratories.

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Judd Slivka
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE LAND: Wildfires: Man, Nature and Journalists - Better Coverage of the Burning Issues

Judd Slivka is an environmental reporter at The Arizona Republic, where he writes mostly about natural resources and public land usage. A red-carded wildland firefighter, Slivka has spent the last two years writing about fire and its impact on the West for the Republic and Gannett News Service.

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Ted Smith
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE FUTURE: High Tech Trash: How to Cover America's Newest Toxic Waste Crisis

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Karen Dorn Steele
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Our Nuclear Legacy: Cleaning Up After the Arms Race

Karen Dorn Steele is an investigative and environmental reporter for The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Wash. She has received numerous awards for her reporting, including a National Headliner Award last year for coverage of the Kaiser Aluminum strike and lockout, and the George Polk and Gerald Loeb awards for a 1994 investigation into squandered money in the Hanford nuclear cleanup.

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Trygve Steen
Event: Thursday, 9:00 p.m. - Welcome to the Wild Northwest

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Bill Steiner
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 4, 11:00 a.m. -
THE GLOBE: Peril in Paradise: The Ecological Crisis on Pacific Islands

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Neil Owen Strassman
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE LAB: Tracking Disease: Exploring Possible Links Between Illness and Environmental Factors

Neil Strassman covers county government and the environment as a reporter at the Star-Telegram newspaper in Fort Worth, Texas, where he also covered health-care issues. He previously worked as a reporter at the Press-Telegram in Long Beach, California, covering the Navy and the environment.

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Bruce Sutherland
Event: Thursday, Day Tour - Pacific Frontier

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Peter Thomson
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE FUTURE: Reporting on Consumption: (Not) Bringing It All Back Home

Peter Thomson was the founding producer and editor of NPR's "Living On Earth," the radio news magazine on the environment. Over nearly a decade at the program he served in a number of positions, most recently senior correspondent and special projects editor, before leaving to embark on a trip around the world and a free-lance career. Peter is a member of the SEJ Board of Directors and a member of the Advisory Board of the Institutes for Journalism and Natural Resources.

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Jennifer L. Turner
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: The Chinese Century: What will the world's most populous nation do with the environment?

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Roberta Ulrich
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Native American Sovereignty and the Environment: What They Wouldn't Teach You in School

Roberta Ulrich is a historian and writer. She published "Empty Nets: Indians, Dams and the Columbia River" in 1999. She has also been a reporter with United Press International and The Oregonian, where she covered Native American issues.

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Susan L. Ustin
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Forests 1: Ecology and Politics of Northwest Forests

Susan L. Ustin is a professor of resource science at the University of California-Davis. Much of her research is on NASA's Imaging Spectrometry program. Susan has been a principal investigator and science team member of several NASA satellite instrument programs for Earth observation. She is director of the UC-Davis California Space Institute Center of Excellence and the Center for Spatial Technologies and Remote Sensing.

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Lynn Vanderkamp
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Salmon 2: Living in the E.S.A.

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Bettina von Hagen
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Green Buildings

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Dr. John Michael Wallace
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE GLOBE: The Breaking Point: A Critical Exploration of Some of the Worst-Case Scenarios in a Warmer World

John M. Wallace is a professor of atmospheric sciences and co-director of the University of Washington program on the environment. From 1981-98, he served as director of the University of Washington/NOAA Joint Institute for the study of the atmosphere and the ocean. John received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Paul Watson
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Culture Renewed: The Return of Aboriginal Whaling in the Pacific Northwest

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Robert Weinhold
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Forests 2: Urban Forests

Robert Weinhold is a free-lance journalist who focuses on health, environmental and environmental health issues. From 1980-95, he practiced as a land planner and landscape architect.

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Luci Wells
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Salmon 2: Living in the E.S.A.

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Patty Wentz
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Spirit of the Salmon

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Dave Werntz
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Forests 1: Ecology and Politics of Northwest Forests

Dave Werntz is science director for the Northwest Ecosystem Alliance, where he works on public forest and endangered species conservation efforts. Dave conducted some of the initial inventory work on spotted owls and old-growth forests in the Pacific Northwest in the mid-1980s. He received a master's degree in forest ecology/conservation biology from the University of Washington in 1994.

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Chris West
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
Forests 1: Ecology and Politics of Northwest Forests

Chris West is vice president of the American Forest Resource Council (formerly the Northwest Forestry Association), and has 21 years of experience in forest management, resource policy analysis and government affairs. With two forestry degrees from the University of California, Berkeley, West worked as a timber management planner, timber sale planner and operations research analyst on forest plans for the US Forest Service for seven years. West also was a member of the Bush/Cheney Transition Team for the Agriculture Department.

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Phil Wexler
Event: Saturday, Reporters Workshop:
Working the Web, 2:15 p.m. (Moderator)

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Tim Wheeler
Event: Friday, Lunch and Plenary Session, 12:00 p.m. -
The Bush Agenda

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Ed Whitelaw
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 1, 10:30 a.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Balancing the Books: Does Environmental Protection Really Promote Economic Growth?

Ed Whitelaw is president of ECONorthwest, an economic and financial consulting firm with offices in Eugene, Portland and Seattle, and a professor of economics at the University of Oregon, where he has taught since 1967. Ed specializes in applied microeconomics, the economic consequences of policy decisions, urban and regional economics, and resource and environmental economics.

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Christine Todd Whitman
Event: Friday, Lunch and Plenary Session, 12:00 p.m. -
The Bush Agenda

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David Williams
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. -
Sprawl 2: Green Businesses

David C.E. Williams is president and CEO of ShoreBank. Before his 10 years of banking experience, David taught physics at both the secondary and collegiate level with a focus on energy issues. Moving to the commercial world, he has been CEO of companies in the oil and gas, robotics, boat building and steel fabrication industries.

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Travis Williams
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Willamette River: National Heritage River and Superfund Site

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Gary Withers
Event: Friday, Welcome and Introductions, 8:30 a.m.

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David Wiwchar
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: Culture Renewed: The Return of Aboriginal Whaling in the Pacific Northwest

David Wiwchar is managing editor and southern region reporter for Ha-Shilth-Sa, Canada's oldest First Nations newspaper. David is a member of the Society of Environmental Journalists as well as the Native American Journalist's Association. David covers environmental and First Nation's issues on a daily basis, and was very involved in the coverage of the Makah whale hunt and cultural celebration.

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Lindsey Woodward
Event: Thursday, Day Tour -
The Changing Face of Farms

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Rene Worme
Event: Saturday, Mini-Tour, 2:15 p.m. - Green Buildings

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Steven Wright
Event: Friday, Concurrent Sessions 2, 2:15 p.m. -
THE ECONOMY: Keeping the Lights On: Who'll Be the Next California?

Stephen J. Wright is acting administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland. He has been with the BPA since 1987. Much of his work involves representing the administration's role in environment and energy-use issues.

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Li Xiguang
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE PACIFIC RIM: The Chinese Century: What will the world's most populous nation do with the environment?

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Carol Kaesuk Yoon
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 am -
THE CRAFT: Science Writing Workshop: Selling the Story with Science

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Chris Zimmer
Event: Saturday, Concurrent Sessions 3, 9:30 a.m. -
THE FUTURE: Last Wilderness

Chris Zimmer is U.S. field coordinator for the Transboundary Watershed Alliance, a coalition of 19 conservation organizations from both sides of the border opposed to unsound logging, mining and road-building while promoting sustainable community development. Mr. Zimmer can also provide an overview on the latest news related to logging and road building in the Tongass National Forest, America's largest.

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The Society of Environmental Journalists
Beth Parke, executive director
P.O. Box 2492 Jenkintown, PA 19046
Telephone: (215) 884-8174 Fax: (215) 884-8175

sej@sej.org

© 1994 Society of Environmental Journalists
The SEJ logo is a registered trademark ® of the Society of Environmental Journalists. Neither the logo nor anything else from the sej.org domain may be reproduced without written consent of the Society of Environmental Journalists.